‘Lovelace’ (2013) (Film Review)

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As someone who didn’t know much about Linda Lovelace, I can’t say I was too bothered about seeing ‘Lovelace’, the story of her porn career and the abuse that came with it. However, it only took about thirty seconds to realise we had made a good choice and I soon forgot about my headache (oh yeah, that old chestnut). The cinematography, music and even Amanda Seyfried, whose face is normally as irritating as a gnat bite, gripped me and what is advertised as a bit of a saucy film instantly becomes one of loyalty, neglect and love.

Each event in Lovelace’s career is cleverly shown from all perspectives, portraying different sides and feelings towards each event. The night of Linda Lovelace and Chuck Traynor’s wedding is shown as both fun with passionate sex and possessive and violent as she later recalls this turning point in their relationship.

The lack of focus on ‘Deep Throat’ (1972), Lovelace’s one and only porn film, allows us to focus on the relationships and emotions that occurred off screen. An unrecognisable Sharon Stone played Dorothy Boreman, Linda’s mother, with a determination that will lead you disliking but feeling sorry for her all at once as she tries to instil traditional marriage values on her young daughter who is the victim of horrific domestic abuse.

As always, Peter Sarsgaard creeped me out from start to finish with his slimy, predatory eyes and performed brilliantly as Chuck Traynor, Linda’s husband who used her to make money in any way he could. Seriously, he could play a saint and he would still make me shudder.

Our heroine is rescued by none other than Sex and the City’s Big (Chris Noth) who gives Chuck a taste of his own medicine and liberates Linda from the porn industry. Despite this short lived career, ‘Deep Throat’ soon became the most famous porn film of its era and is still internationally renowned. Although ‘Lovelace’ has a long way to go before reaching the same dizzy heights of popularity, it is a captivating film that is worth a look, especially if you know nothing about the 1972 classic and it’s star.

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